Tag Archive for: IOT

“Direct-to-device” communication in the context of satellite technology is a significant and evolving topic with a potentially substantial market impact. This communication approach involves sending data, content, or services directly to user devices, such as smartphones, without the need for intermediary ground-based infrastructure or additional user equipment. Here are some key points to consider regarding direct-to-device satellite communication:

  1. Market Potential: The direct-to-device satellite communication market holds immense potential, with estimates of its value reaching up to $100 billion. This potential is driven by various factors, including the growing demand for connectivity in remote or underserved areas, disaster response and recovery efforts, IoT applications, and more.
  2. Low Earth Orbit (LEO) Satellites: The rise of LEO satellite constellations, such as SpaceX and OneWeb, is a driving force behind the concept of direct-to-device communication. LEO satellites operate at lower altitudes, reducing latency and enabling direct communication with user devices.
  3. Reduced Latency: Direct-to-device communication via LEO satellites can significantly reduce latency compared to traditional geostationary satellites. This low-latency connectivity is essential for applications like online gaming, video conferencing, and real-time IoT data transmission.
  4. Global Coverage: Direct-to-device satellite networks aim to provide global coverage, extending connectivity to remote and rural areas that lack terrestrial infrastructure. This has the potential to bridge the digital divide and bring the benefits of the internet to underserved populations.
  5. Challenges: While direct-to-device satellite communication offers numerous advantages, it also comes with challenges. These include regulatory issues, spectrum management, satellite constellation deployment, cost-effectiveness, and competition with existing terrestrial networks.
  6. Emerging Applications: Beyond traditional internet access, direct-to-device satellite communication can support a wide range of applications, including disaster management, environmental monitoring, precision agriculture, and autonomous vehicles.
  7. Economic Impact: The success of direct-to-device satellite communication could have a substantial economic impact, fostering innovation, creating job opportunities, and stimulating economic growth in various sectors.

Therefore, direct-to-device satellite communication represents a significant shift in how we think about connectivity, with the potential to reshape industries, bridge connectivity gaps, and create new opportunities for businesses and individuals. However, its success depends on addressing technical, regulatory, and economic challenges while capitalizing on the advantages it offers in terms of global coverage and low latency.

The global satellite services market is poised for growth in the coming years, with expectations of its value increasing from $107 billion in 2022 to $123 billion by 2032, according to projections by Euroconsult. Key insights from this forecast include:

  1. Data Services Surge: Data services revenues are expected to experience significant growth, nearly tripling from $19 billion in 2022 to $53 billion in 2032. This surge is indicative of the increasing demand for data connectivity, driven by applications like IoT, data analytics, and global internet access.
  2. Video Demand Shift: In contrast, Euroconsult foresees a slight dip in video demand, with revenues decreasing by about 20 percent from $88 billion in 2022 to $70 billion in 2032. This shift may be attributed to changing consumer preferences, including the rise of streaming services and on-demand content.
  3. Competition and Ecosystem Changes: Despite the overall optimism, the satellite services market is expected to face turbulence due to intense competition and a rapidly evolving ecosystem. The dynamics of the industry are shifting, with the emergence of new satellite constellations and technologies, challenging the established players.
  4. Insurance Impact: Recent anomalies in geostationary orbit, such as issues with satellites like Arcturus, Inmarsat 6 F2, and Viasat-3 Americas, are expected to impact the insurance market. These incidents have raised concerns and could lead to higher insurance costs for satellite operators.

In summary, the satellite services market is poised for growth, driven by increasing demand for data connectivity services. However, the industry faces challenges, including competition, ecosystem changes, and insurance concerns, which could impact its trajectory in the coming years. Nonetheless, satellite technology continues to play a crucial role in global connectivity and data transmission.

Iridium Messaging Transport (IMT) is designed to simplify the development of satellite IoT services.

Iridium Communications Inc. recently announced the service introduction of IMTSM, a two-way cloud-native networked data service optimized for use over Iridium Certus® and programmed to make it easier to add satellite connections to existing or new IoT solutions.

IMT provides an IP data transport service unique to the Iridium® network, designed for small-to-moderate-sized messages supporting satellite IoT applications. Integrated with CloudConnect and Amazon Web Services (AWS), the new service can reduce development costs and speed time to market for new Iridium Connected® IoT devices. IMT has been highly anticipated by Iridium’s partner ecosystem and is currently available for the Iridium Certus 100 service with introduction on Iridium Certus 200, 350 and 700 planned for the first quarter of 2023.

As a connectionless messaging service for Iridium CertusTM modules, IMT aligns with current established server-device message constructs using hubs, Pub/Sub or queues, depending on application platforms. The IMT service can be used by a customer application that is ‘store and forward’ or has small amounts of data traffic that does not require a persistent connection between servers, utilizing an Iridium Certus terminal. Whether it’s machine-to-machine (M2M), e-mails, weather updates, transactions, or group communications, IMT enhances two-way messaging to and from anywhere in the world.

IMT is utilized with the Iridium CloudConnect model of server-side message processing, regardless of the underlying over-the-air and ground systems technologies and protocols. The Iridium CloudConnect service combines Iridium IoT capabilities with AWS cloud services extending customers’ IoT reach to the more than 85 percent of the earth that lacks terrestrial coverage. IMT utilizes industry-standard protocols and technology for managing and delivering messages in the cloud, including MQTT, HTTPS and WebSocket (WSS). This makes IMT an easier, faster, and less expensive protocol to develop with, supporting users with countless advantages to design applications that are scalable and easier to distribute to other platforms.

Among the first products built with IMT available are the RockREMOTE by Ground Control and STREAM+ by MetOcean Telematics. The RockREMOTE offers a reliable and flexible solution for industrial IoT applications including oil and gas, mining, utilities and renewables, and transport & cargo. It has a built-in MQTT application that allows developers to submit and receive data payloads across the MQTT protocol. Users can send and receive messages, pictures, to and from anywhere in the world utilizing this IMT implementation over the Iridium Certus 100 service.

STREAM+ allows users to send and receive files and messages securely. Designed for field applications with size, weight, and power constraints, STREAM+ offers a range of industry standard protocols, features, and inputs simplifying integration and installation for end users and reducing development costs and overall time to market.

Unique in the satellite industry, Iridium Certus is the only broadband service that provides reliable, weather-resilient connectivity for on-the-move internet, high-quality voice, email, live-action video and IoT data transfer. Through its constellation of crosslinked satellites in Low-Earth Orbit (LEO), Iridium is the only communications company that offers truly global coverage and is ideally suited for IoT applications.

A satellite image of a Fish Farm (Courtesy of R3-IoT) Scottish Satellite IoT Startup

Scottish Satellite IoT Startup Two former Clyde Space engineers are seeking initial investment for their new Glasgow-based startup, R3-IoT, which aims to provide satellite IoT and backhaul services to industries operating in the most remote regions of the world. R3-I0T Co-Founders Allan Cannon and Kevin Quillien said their target markets would include land and sea agriculture, environmental monitoring, remote healthcare, and renewable energy.

“There is a huge market for this kind of service. Interest is growing in predominantly large enterprises across a range of sectors looking to make efficiencies or improve productivity through better access to data,” said Cannon. “We’ve had a lot of interest in our funding round as we look to take the business to the next stage.”

Through their new venture, Cannon and Quillien hope to make it easier for remote businesses to connect their assets to data. As the global enterprise market transitions to “Industry 4.0,” for which nearly all assets are connected, collecting and transmitting data in order to keep up with the pace of innovation, connecting data pipes to remote assets can be difficult and expensive. “[Our customers] may even currently send someone in a plane or boat to collect the data, which is time-consuming, expensive, and the data itself is lagged by the time it’s delivered to decision-makers,” said Cannon. Scottish Satellite IoT Startup

For many of these remote operations, satellite IoT is the most viable solution, requiring less infrastructure investment compared to other options.

R3-IoT opens their first investment round after recently winning a 100,000 British-pound prize at the Scottish Edge awards. The new company also solidified a partnership with Scotland’s Censis Innovation Center for IoT, sensor and imaging technologies. Censis will assist Cannon and Quillien with research and product development, specifically to enhance data transfer from rural sensor networks to the cloud, via satellite, making data collection more timely, efficient and cost-effective.

Censis Senior Business Development Manager Craig Fleming said that R3-IoT brings a “game-changing” technology to market. “R3-IoT gives businesses the opportunity to understand their operations where previously it wasn’t technologically feasible or economically viable,” he said. “What R3-IoT is doing underlines the transformative potential of IoT and the hidden value it can unlock in companies, whether they are tech-focused or operating in more traditional industries.”

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One of the largest telcos in the United Kingdom, O2, has partnered with Spanish satellite operator Hispasat, the Universities of Oxford and Glasgow, the European Space Agency (ESA), and a consortium of startup companies for a major project to test satellite and 5G technologies to support connected and autonomous vehicles. The four-year trail program will be called “Project Darwin.” European Satellite, Telecom Operators

Project Darwin will be housed at the Harwell Science and Innovation Campus in Oxfordshire, U.K. The project will begin work next month, with plans to explore key connected vehicle and vehicle-SIM platforms plus AI neural network integration. Hispasat will supply satellite connectivity for the trials. European Satellite, Telecom Operators

“Project Darwin is an important piece of the connected and autonomous vehicle puzzle,” O2 COO Derek McManus said in a statement. “The research taking place at Harwell during the next four years will be vital in the creation of new transport ecosystems for the UK public and the companies that will offer these services,” adding that O2 will be activating its 5G network at the Millbrook Testing Ground for self-driving cars in Bedfordshire.

Project Darwin is also receiving support from the U.K. Government to launch a partner study to help discover the different elements needed for the larger program. “Autonomous vehicles need robust, high-speed mobile data connections to operate effectively,” said U.K. Space Agency Director of Growth Catherine Mealing-Jones. “Building the technology to link them to telecoms satellites will allow you to take your car wherever you want to go, and not just to areas with a strong mobile signal.” European Satellite, Telecom Operators